h
30 April 2019

Netherlands must reject trade treaty with Canada

When the city of Hamburg decided to introduce stricter environmental regulations in order to protect, amongst other things, access to drinking water, energy giant Vattenfall registered a protest. The company demanded a cool €1.4 billion, because it perceived the reform as a threat to potential future profits. The case was in the end hastily settled and Hamburg came away with nothing worse than a scare, but the city did readjust its environmental regulations. As a result, the German government was in its turn subject to a legal complaint from the European Commission, on the grounds that the country no longer fulfilled the requirements of the EU Habitats Directive. This is just one of countless examples of investors from outside the country in question claiming enormous damages for the simple reason that a decision, taken democratically, has put downward pressure on its expected profits. Even when this does not lead to an verdict favourable to the plaintiff, it sometimes manages to seriously undermine democracy.

Read more
30 April 2019

Billions for EU arms industry is madness

Foto: SP

Arnout Hoekstra and Sadet Karabalut

For decades we were told that the EU was an organisation dedicated to peace. Previously warlike countries were now working together because  the EU and its forerunners, had now dissuaded them from going to war with each other. This appearance can no longer be maintained. The established parties have opted for far-reaching militarisation and a new Cold War with Russia. In the years to come, billions of euros are to be freed up to subsidise major European arms corporations. That is an undesirable development which presents an enormous danger to our security. 

Read more
29 April 2019

Don't let Brussels play the boss

Foto: SP

It could scarcely be more symbolic. On May 9, Europe Day, the great and the good of the European elite assemble in a picturesque village in Romania, the EU's most corrupt country, a country which is currently heavily interfering with the rule of law in order to enable politicians who have been found guilty of fraud to avoid punishment. An excellent place to have an informal chat about the future of the European Union. It could scarcely be more symbolic, but it could certainly also hardly be more cynical.

Read more
23 April 2019

SP Euro-MPs Anne-Marie Mineur and Dennis de Jong talk about their work in the European Parliament

Don't forget! On 23rd May elections will be held for the European Parliament. The SP's two MEPs are both standing down, and as well as offering a few tips to those who will be seeking to replace them, they discuss their achievements.

Read more
17 April 2019

Borderless European market bad for cooperation

The Senate's annual debate on the state of Europe and the European Union – known by its Dutch initials as the AEB – was this year even more important than usual, as SP Senator Bastiaan van Apeldoorn noted in his contribution to the discussion. "On 23rd May we elect the European Parliament in the midst of Brexit, discussions around NATO, China and a European army, and an ever more unpredictable United States under President Trump, he said. “The SP shows that there's more to vote for than on the one side europhoric parties that want nothing more than to give more power to Brussels and on the other side xenophobic nationalists looking to turn their backs on European cooperation and do nothing about cross-border problems.”

Read more
16 April 2019

European Labour Authority is so much hot air

The European Parliament votes today on the establishment of a European Labour Authority, a new agency to monitor the application of labour laws in the EU. In the SP's view this is a bad idea, as SP Euro-MP Dennis de Jong explains: “Brussels keeps coming up with false solutions for problems which are in reality a direct result of the free movement of labour. Exploitation of Spanish workers in the Netherlands won't be solved by a new agency in Cyprus or Slovakia. What's needed is for the capacity of national inspectorates to be sufficient for them to be able to do their work. Cooperation with other member states on cross-border issues can be handled via the existing European network, so there's no need for a new institution. This plan is just hot air.”

Read more
15 April 2019

The nonsense of the 'Spitzenkandidaat'

Foto: SP

In the runup to the European Parliament elections, the German term 'Spitzenkandidaat' has spread into non-German-speaking countries. Hard to translate into English, but you get the general idea from the fact that the 'Spits' in football is the striker. Member states are obliged to use some kind of party list system in these elections, so the 'Spitzenkandidaat' is the lead candidate on these lists. However, in this terminology, the Spitzenkandidaat is a lead candidate across the EU. The title suggests that he or she is not confined to his or her own country, but is a European super-striker. A lead candidate electable in the entire European Union. A senseless suggestion, because in reality a candidate can stand and be elected in only one of the twenty-eight member states, and after the Brexit, just one of twenty-seven. The borderless nature of these 'Spitzen' says, therefore, more about their own egos than their electability.

Read more
11 April 2019

'Enhanced legitimacy, credibility, impact, and relevance': SP Senator's resolution improves working of Council of Europe

Following hours of debate and months of preparatory work, the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) this week agreed to proposals from SP Senator Tiny Kox aimed at improving the functioning of the Assembly and the Council of which it forms part.

Read more
11 April 2019

SP urges introduction of compulsory visas for Albanians

Foto: No attribution

The SP believes that Albanians should be required to apply for visas to enter the Netherlands. SP Member of Parliament Jasper van Dijk made this proposal during Thursday's parliamentary debate on the high rate of criminality amongst Albanian visitors to the country. Since 2014 Albanians have been able to enter the Netherlands freely as a result of the liberalisation of visa regulations, and this has led to an enormous upsurge in crime. This applies to relatively small-scale offences such as shoplifting and pickpocketing, and more serious matters like dealing in hard drugs, extortion and people-smuggling. This has been accompanied by a rise in demands for asylum from Albanians, applications which are very rarely successful because Albania is regarded as a safe country. Visa liberalisation occurred as a result of many EU member states' determination to accept Albania as a member of the European Union in the foreseeable future, despite the country's high levels of destitution and corruption.

Read more

Pages

About the SP

Using the menu in the left-bar, you can get to know the SP, its history, activities, representatives and publications. You’ll also find a selection of SP news and the weekly blog by MEP Dennis de Jong.